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Four Favorites from TEDxUF 2016

There are many different types of identities. There are identities you connect with, other people’s perception of your identities and identities you just don’t understand. Because humans rely so readily on categorizing people, places and things, identities play an immeasurable role in our lives.

Ten different speakers at TEDxUF expressed their experience with identities in their school, careers, jail and lives. Through sharing inspirational anecdotes, groundbreaking research and their own personal stories, TEDxUF showcased individuals with different identities and passions, but one uniting goal: making the world a better place through a better understanding of who we really are. Read more

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‘Embrace The Power,’ Ex-NFL Back Tells LGBTQ Teenagers At Purchase College

PURCHASE, N.Y. — Former NFL defensive cornerback Wade Davis, who came out as gay in 2012, told hundreds of LGBTQ middle and high school students to “embrace the power of being free, the power of being yourself” at an all-day conference at Purchase College on Wednesday.

The PrideWorks 2016 conference, which drew about 540 LGBTQ middle and high school students to the SUNY Purchase campus, featured 36 workshops and 58 speakers. Read more

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Wade Davis: professional football player, openly gay man, promoter of equality

Wade Davis defies stereotypes. He’s a former member of the NFL who played for the Tennessee Titans, the Washington Redskins and the Seattle Seahawks. He is an openly gay man who co-founded the YOU Belong Initiative, a clinic that offers LGBTQ youth comprehensive sports and leadership instruction, and he is the executive director of You Can Play, an organization dedicated to fighting homophobia in professional sports.

Davis travels across the country speaking to college and professional sports teams, as well as companies and universities about issues of racism, sexism and homophobia. After his talk at the University of Montana on March 10, he sat down with the Kaimin to talk about football and its relationship to gender, race and orientation equality. Read more

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Manny Pacquiao could pay for not keeping up with changing world

When controversy crested over Manny Pacquiao’s assertion last week that same-sex couples were “worse than animals,” the Filipino boxing star defaulted to a now-familiar routine: apologize in public, wait for public ill will to recede, then resume making cash.

In May 2012, he called same-sex marriage “an abomination,” told critics he had nothing against homosexuals then watched his fan base and endorsement portfolio continue to grow. So when Pacquiao issued his latest apology via social media the 37-year-old former world champion had no reason to think this situation would end any differently.

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